State of Maryland Recognizes Green Globes as Approved Green Building Certification for High Performance Building Program

The Maryland Department of General Services Office of the Secretary has approved the use of the Green Building Initiative’s Green Globes rating system, and certification of Two Green Globes or higher, as equivalent to the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED silver rating.

The Green Building Initiative® (GBI), sole provider of the Green Globes® certification program in the United States, is pleased to announce that the Maryland Department of General Services Office of the Secretary has approved the use of the Green Building Initiative’s Green Globes rating system, and certification of Two Green Globes or higher, as equivalent to the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED silver rating. Approval by the state followed the unanimous recommendation of the Maryland Green Building Council, which was created by the state in 2007 to guide Maryland’s High Performance Building Program.

“GBI applauds the state of Maryland and the Maryland Green Building Council for its leadership and recognition of Green Globes. We look forward to partnering with the state to further the high performance of its buildings,” GBI President Vicki Worden said. “In Maryland, there already are 83 buildings assessed using Green Globes for New Construction, Green Globes for Existing Buildings, or GBI’s Guiding Principle Compliance® program for federal buildings. Our Green Globes Assessors have the experience and knowledge needed to evaluate accomplishments and support continuous improvement to help the state meet its green building goals.”

The number of jurisdictions recognizing Green Globes as equivalent continues to grow. The U.S. federal government recognizes Green Globes equivalency to LEED for agency-owned buildings. In 2016, the General Services Administration’s Office of Leasing updated its leasing policy to officially recognize Green Globes certification as part of the government’s ongoing efforts to increase its use of high-performing private sector office space.

State and local governments across the country have adopted Green Globes. The state of Nevada offers property tax abatements for buildings that have earned Green Globes certification. The city of Chicago’s Sustainable Development Policy also recognizes Green Globes, requiring projects receiving public funding be designed to meet and earn green building certification.

Green Globes is based on a 1,000-point system covering seven areas of green building best practices. A third-party certified Green Globes Assessor evaluates every building for compliance to Green Globes assessment criteria and takes into consideration issues that are unique to each building or project based on building type and function. A certification of One, Two, Three or Four Green Globes is earned based on the percentage of applicable practices incorporated into the building, project or interior space.

About the Green Building Initiative—The GBI is a nonprofit organization and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standards Developer dedicated to accelerating the adoption of green building best practices. Founded in 2004, the organization is the sole U.S. provider of the Green Globes and federal Guiding Principles Compliance building certification programs. To learn more about opportunities to become involved in the GBI, contact info(at)thegbi.org or visit the GBI website, http://www.thegbi.org.

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About the Author: Carrie Brunner

Carrie Brunner grew up in a small town in northern New Brunswick. She studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married her husband one month later. They were then blessed with two baby boys within the first four years of marriage. Having babies gave their family a desire to return to the old paths – to nourish their family with traditional, homegrown foods; rid their home of toxic chemicals and petroleum products; and give their boys a chance to know a simple, sustainable way of life. They are currently building a homestead from scratch on two little acres in central Texas. There’s a lot to be done to become somewhat self-sufficient, but they are debt-free and get to spend their days living this simple, good life together with their five young children. Carrie writes mostly on provincial stories.
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