Religious Freedom “Listening Session” at the Church of Scientology

The Nashville Church of Scientology held an International Religious Freedom Day “listening session” in partnership with the Tennessee chapter of United for Human Rights to gather information for the group’s 2018 State of Religious Freedom Report.

Press Release updated: Nov 1, 2017 07:00 PDT

The mission of Tennessee United for Human Rights is to bring about human rights reform by raising awareness of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. To further this purpose, the group organized an International Religious Freedom Day “listening session” Oct 27 to call attention to this vitally important right.

Rev. Brian Fesler, pastor of the Nashville Church of Scientology and regional coordinator of  Tennessee United for Human Rights (TnUHR) said, “Religious freedom is so fundamental, so basic, so natural—it is impossible to imagine a world at peace without this essential human right.” 

TnUHR plans to publish a State of Religious Freedom Report for Tennessee in 2018, which will include the information gathered through this focus group.

Several faith leaders representing Muslim, Sikh and Christian denominations contributed their views during this public listening session. They were posed and answered questions about their faiths, public perception of their religions, and religious discrimination.

TnUHR is a chapter of United for Human Rights, an international organization formed on the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. United for Human Rights provides human rights resources and educational materials to all sectors of society. For more information visit tnuhr.org

For more information, visit the Scientology Newsroom.

Source: ScientologyNews.org

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About the Author: Carrie Brunner

Carrie Brunner grew up in a small town in northern New Brunswick. She studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married her husband one month later. They were then blessed with two baby boys within the first four years of marriage. Having babies gave their family a desire to return to the old paths – to nourish their family with traditional, homegrown foods; rid their home of toxic chemicals and petroleum products; and give their boys a chance to know a simple, sustainable way of life. They are currently building a homestead from scratch on two little acres in central Texas. There’s a lot to be done to become somewhat self-sufficient, but they are debt-free and get to spend their days living this simple, good life together with their five young children. Carrie writes mostly on provincial stories.
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