Bringing Braille to Developing Countries

Dolphin EasyConverter Express. "A game changing development for the millions of people living with sight loss in developing countries". Kevin Carey, World Braille Council.

EasyConverter Express

A game changing development for the millions of people living with sight loss in developing countries.

Today sees the launch of a new app which will help blind and partially sighted people in developing countries to access information in braille, large print and audio formats.

The free app, called EasyConverter Express, has been developed by Dolphin with support from the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) and grant support from Google.org as a gift to the World Blind Union (WBU) and International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI).

It is estimated that there are 253 million people worldwide with vision impairment, and it is hoped that this app will reach many of those living in developing countries.

EasyConverter Express will enable the production of braille, large print, MP3 and DAISY talking book formats from Word files through a set of simple menus.

Kevin Carey, Chair of the World Braille Council and outgoing Chair of RNIB, said: “I truly believe EasyConverter Express is a game changing development for the millions of people living with sight loss in developing countries. It is a fabulously simple product, specifically designed to get braille, large print and audio to blind and partially sighted people in the world’s poorest countries. It’s free and immediately available and I hope that it will make a big difference in terms of access to information and literacy.”

EasyConverter Express is available in English, French & Portuguese and is a free download from http://www.YourDolphin.com/easyconverter-express for individuals with sight loss or organisations working with blind and partially sighted children and adults in developing countries.

Powered by WPeMatico

You might like

About the Author: Carrie Brunner

Carrie Brunner grew up in a small town in northern New Brunswick. She studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married her husband one month later. They were then blessed with two baby boys within the first four years of marriage. Having babies gave their family a desire to return to the old paths – to nourish their family with traditional, homegrown foods; rid their home of toxic chemicals and petroleum products; and give their boys a chance to know a simple, sustainable way of life. They are currently building a homestead from scratch on two little acres in central Texas. There’s a lot to be done to become somewhat self-sufficient, but they are debt-free and get to spend their days living this simple, good life together with their five young children. Carrie writes mostly on provincial stories.
%d bloggers like this: