Brain Injury Association of America Supports Bipartisan Policy Agreement to Repeal Therapy Caps

“Individuals who sustain moderate to severe brain injuries must have access to comprehensive rehabilitation with therapies of sufficient scope, duration, and intensity,” said Susan Connors, president/CEO of the Brain Injury Association of America.

Leaders in the House Energy and Commerce Committee, the House Ways and Means Committee, and the Senate Finance Committee announced a bipartisan policy agreement Thursday to repeal the annual limit on per-patient therapy expenditures in Medicare, otherwise known as therapy caps. Americans living with brain injury have often seen therapy caps as a block to their own recovery; the 2017 Medicare therapy cap limits are $1,980 for physical therapy and speech-language pathology services combined, for example, and $1,980 for occupational therapy services.

“Individuals who sustain moderate to severe brain injuries must have access to comprehensive rehabilitation with therapies of sufficient scope, duration, and intensity,” said Susan Connors, president/CEO of the Brain Injury Association of America. Comprehensive rehabilitation after brain injury is essential to regain lost skills and live as independently as possible.”

Powered by WPeMatico

You might like

About the Author: Carrie Brunner

Carrie Brunner grew up in a small town in northern New Brunswick. She studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married her husband one month later. They were then blessed with two baby boys within the first four years of marriage. Having babies gave their family a desire to return to the old paths – to nourish their family with traditional, homegrown foods; rid their home of toxic chemicals and petroleum products; and give their boys a chance to know a simple, sustainable way of life. They are currently building a homestead from scratch on two little acres in central Texas. There’s a lot to be done to become somewhat self-sufficient, but they are debt-free and get to spend their days living this simple, good life together with their five young children. Carrie writes mostly on provincial stories.
%d bloggers like this: