Innovation Benchmarking in Railcar Coatings Market: 2024

Albany, NY — 01/10/2018 — Railcar coating is a protection layer applied on tank cars, boxcars, hoppers, and other transportation vehicles to protect the surface from moisture, corrosion, microbes, and other external factors. Railcars need to be protected from various external factors, as these carry flammable and other hazardous chemicals and substances. Therefore, vehicles are being coated with railcar coatings. Railcar coatings protect the surface of railcars from corrosion, moisture, and microbes. They helps in maintaining the vehicle. Railcars are large vehicles and require significant investment. Thus, it is necessary to maintain railcars.

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Based upon coating demand by railcar type, the market can be segmented into tanks car, open hoppers, covered hoppers, boxcars, and others. The tanks car segment accounted for the major share of almost 35% of the market in 2016. Tank cars are used to transport liquid and gaseous commodities. The vehicle is not owned by the railroad, instead is leased by private owners who use them to transport their products. Tank cars are primarily used in North America and Europe. According to the American Association of Railroads, currently, more than 380,000 railroad tank cars are in service. Railcars are likely to wear and tear due to their extensive usage. Weather changes also affect the surface of the railcars leading to deterioration of the product type.

Railcars should be protected and taken care of just as vehicle carries highly flammable liquid and other products that can be dangerous to life. The product surface is coated with railcar coatings in order to protect the surface from external climate and wear & tear. Coatings applied to the walls of various railcars are chemically inert and are certified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and National Science Foundation (NSF). Covered hoppers held the next key share of the market followed by open hoppers. Boxcars accounted for low share of the railcar coatings market. Demand and usage of boxcars are observed to be decreasing in certain region as tank cars and covered hoppers are seen to replace boxcars, due to which the maintenance of boxcars are observed to be decreasing. Therefore, the boxcar segment accounts for low share of the railcar coatings market.

North America held prominent share of the railcar coatings market in 2016. These kinds of vehicles are majorly observed to be operating in North America and Europe region. Demand for railcar coatings is high in these regions, as these vehicles are commonly used for transportation of liquid fuels and other hazardous products in North America and Europe. Demand for covered hoppers is higher than that of tank cars in North America. Europe constituted the next key share of the market in 2016. Germany had a total of 15,492 locomotives and railcars in 2011.

The railcar coatings market in Asia Pacific is anticipated to expand significantly in the near future. Growth in industrialization in Asia Pacific is driving the market in the region. This is supported by stable economic conditions, which result in high disposable incomes. Middle East & Africa and Latin America held the least share of the railcar coatings market in 2016. The share of the region is projected to increase in the near future.

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Key players operating in the railcar coatings market include PPG Industries, AkzoNobel N.V., Hempel USA, The Sherwin-Williams Company, The Valspar Corporation, and Axalta Coating Systems.

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About the Author: Carrie Brunner

Carrie Brunner grew up in a small town in northern New Brunswick. She studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married her husband one month later. They were then blessed with two baby boys within the first four years of marriage. Having babies gave their family a desire to return to the old paths – to nourish their family with traditional, homegrown foods; rid their home of toxic chemicals and petroleum products; and give their boys a chance to know a simple, sustainable way of life. They are currently building a homestead from scratch on two little acres in central Texas. There’s a lot to be done to become somewhat self-sufficient, but they are debt-free and get to spend their days living this simple, good life together with their five young children. Carrie writes mostly on provincial stories.
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